Gordon’s The Philosophical Origins of Austrian Economics

Full text here.

My brief summary:

Austrian economists Menger, Bohm-Bawerk, and Mises all had various philosophical influences.

Aristotle – influenced Menger through Bentrano. Against the German Historical School, which emphasized the interconnectedness of everything and denied the existence of any kind of universal economic laws that would apply across different societies, Bentrano emphasized the ability to separate pieces of reality in our analysis. Specifically, Bentrano separated the acts of the mind from the objects of those acts. In Menger, this showed up as people making judgments of value. So, value is not intrinsic to the good – or even to the mind. Rather, it is a matter of a judgment that the mind makes about the good. Aristotle also emphasized that true science is deductive – treating empirical science as a stand-in for true science until our understanding of the deductive structure develops sufficiently.

Occam – had a big influence on Bohm-Bawerk – especially in the need to trace all concepts back to their origin in perception. This led Bohm-Bawerk to reject mystical sorts of notions in social science and to be very concerned with clarity and thoroughness in the analysis. This is especially obvious in his criticism of Marx. Rather than settling at criticizing the labor theory of value (which would have been sufficient), Bohm-Bawerk criticized Marx more or less line-by-line.

Kant – Not as big an influence as you’d expect. He provided some of the Misesian language, but Mises doesn’t rely on Kant’s philosophical system.

The Logical Positivists – probably the biggest influence on Mises, but in the negative direction. Much of Mises’s more philosophical work was defending a deductive method against the logical positivists, who favored empirical methods as being the only real way to do “science”.

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